Total Body Water Calculator - Calculate Ideal Body Water

Total Body Water Calculator - Calculate Ideal Body Water

Total Body Water

kg

ft.in

cm

Result

Total Body Water

  • Total Body water is the primary building block for cells.
  • It helps to regulate the internal body temperature, strengthens your muscles, and moisturizes your skin.

 

Total Body Water Calculator (TBW)

  • Total Body Water (TBW) is the total amount of water present in the body in the form of body fluids, tissues, and organs.
  • In a broad way, the water content in the human body is divided into two types; intracellular fluid and extracellular fluid.
  • Intracellular fluid is the water stored inside the cells.
  • It constitutes about two third of the total body water content.
  • Extracellular fluid is the water stored and flowing outside the cells.
  • Extracellular fluid constitutes about one-third of the total body water.
  • An average female adult human body contains 50% of water and a male adult body contains 60% of water.
  • But this amount varies based on various factors like height, weight, age, disease, etc.
  • There are several formulas to calculate the total body water content.

 

Ideal Body Water Percentage

  • Body water declines as you age, but it will remain above 50 percent for most, if not all, of your lifetime.
  • The normal range for adult women varies between 45% and 60%.
  • For men, the ideal body water percentage fluctuates between 50% and 65% of the total body.
  • In babies, that number is much higher. The norm is considered to be between 75% and 78%, dropping to 65% by one year of age.

 

Total Body Water Calculator Formula

The popular and most used ones are the formulas put forward by:

  • Watson PE, Watson ID, and Batt R are called Watson Formula (TBW-W).
  • Hume R, Weyers E called as Hume-Weyer Formula (TBW-H).
  • Chertow GM, Lazarus JM, Lew NL, Ma L, Lowrie EG called as Chertow Formula (TBW-C).

 

However, several studies have designed different gender-specific equations that allow for TBW estimates based on more specific data, such as age and height.

 

Watson Formulas

  • Male TBW = 2.447 - (0.09156 x age) + (0.1074 x height) + (0.3362 x weight)
  • Female TBW = -2.097 + (0.1069 x height) + (0.2466 x weight)

 

Hume-Weyers Formulas

  • Male TBW = (0.194786 x height) + (0.296785 x weight) - 14.012934
  • Female TBW = (0.34454 x height) + (0.183809 x weight) - 35.270121

 

Mellits-Cheek Formulas Specifically Designed for Use in Children

  • Boys TBW (height < 132.7 cm) = -1.927 + 0.465 x weight + 0.045 x height
  • Boys TBW (height > 132.7 cm) = -21.993 + 0.406 x weight + 0.209 x height
  • Girls TBW (height < 110.8 cm) = 0.076 + 0.507 x weight + 0.013 x height
  • Girls TBW (height > 110.8 cm) = -10.313 + 0.252 x weight + 0.154 x height

 

Body Water Fluid Intake Tips Agewise

Age

Recommended fluid intake (milliliters per day)

0–6 months

700

6–12 months

800

1–2 years

1,300

4–8 years

1,700

9–13 years (males)

2,400

9–13 years (females)

2,100

14–18 years (males)

3,300

14–18 years (females)

2,300

Adult male

3,700

Adult female

2,700

During pregnancy

3,000

While breastfeeding

3,800

 

Body Water Volumes

Percentage of water in your main organ body water volumes.

Body Part

Water Percentage

brain and heart

73%

lungs

83%

skin

64%

muscles and kidneys

79%

bones

31%



Body Water Content

Almost every cell in your body contains water mainly which makes body water 79% of your muscles, 73% of your brain, and even 31% of your bones.

 

Body part

Water percentage

Brain

80–85%

Kidneys

80–85%

Heart

75–80%

Lungs

75–80%

Muscles

70–75%

Liver

70–75%

Skin

70–75%

Blood

50%

Bones

20–25%

Teeth

8–10%



Body Fat Percentage with Body Water Range

The following tables give the average percentages and ranges of water in the body, according to sex and age:

 

Age 12–18 years

Age 19–50 years

Age 51 years and older

Male

Average: 59%

Range: 52–66%

Average: 59%

Range: 43–73%

Average: 56%

Range: 47–67%

Female

Average: 56%

Range: 49–63%

Average: 50%

Range: 41–60%

Average: 47%

Range: 39–57%

 

10 Dangers Of Dehydration Due to Body Water

Here are 10 Dangers Of Dehydration for not consuming enough liquid, which can be severe.

 

1. Muscle Cramps

Many athletes suffer the misfortune of experiencing what is commonly known as a “Charlie Horse” when dehydrated, especially in outdoor sports where the heat can cause the body to excessively sweat with a rise in body temperature and therefore become dehydrated due to water loss in the body.

 

Athletes are always suggested to consume electrolytes and potassium to decrease the risks of cramping.

 

You don’t have to be an athlete to experience muscle cramps. For those that drink insufficient amounts of water and are minimally active dehydration, and therefore involuntary contraction of muscles due to hypersensitivity can be a result.

 

2. Constipation

A lack of hydration can cause the intestinal cells to extract water in the intestines making the waste become hard, resulting in constipation.

 

3. Hypertension

For those that are chronically dehydrated, high blood pressure is common. With the body’s lack of water, in the cells, the brain sends a signal to the pituitary gland to secrete vasopressin, which helps the constriction of blood vessels. The result causes blood pressure to increase, leading to hypertension.

 

4. Kidney Stones

When urine becomes concentrated, the minerals from the urine accumulate in a crystal formation. This then gets deposited into the kidneys as kidney stones.

 

5. Uremia

The kidneys help filter waste while diluting urine but to do that they need a sufficient amount of water in the body. With not enough water in the body to allow proper function of the kidneys, waste that should have been excreted gets trapped, circulating throughout the body.

 

6. Gallstones

Dehydration can cause the contraction of bile ducts in the liver, resulting in gallstones.

 

7. Kidney Disease

With low amounts of water in the body, the kidneys have to reduce urine formation which causes the capillaries to constrict in areas like the heart and brain, resulting in high blood pressure.

 

The combination of high blood pressure and urine retention causes serious kidney damage, eventually leading to kidney disease.

 

8. Joint Complications

With dehydration, the cartilage in joints ends up rubbing together causing wear and tear over time, and weakening the joints. By simply adjusting water intake and the resulting formation of new cells, the cartilage can be repaired.

 

A consistent lack of water only increases the delay of repair to the damaged joints, which can end up completely wearing out the cartilage over time.

 

9. Depression

Requiring 85% water, water deficiency in the brain can result in impaired brain functions and energy supply, leading to fatigue, lethargy, and depression.

 

10. Death

Our bodies hold up 55-60%, varying depending on age, sex, activity level, and health. Every function of the body requires water to properly do its job to keep our body running healthy and smoothly.

 

A result of severe hydration is death, so make sure to be aware of the warning symptoms and get an adequate amount of water intake each day!

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FAQ

How do you calculate total body water?

Formula For Calculating Total Body water for male and female are :

  • Male TBW = 2.447 - (0.09156 x age) + (0.1074 x height) + (0.3362 x weight)
  • Female TBW = -2.097 + (0.1069 x height) + (0.2466 x weight)

What is the normal value of total body water?

Normal Value of total body water in the body, according to sex and age:

 

Age 12–18 years

Age 19–50 years

Age 51 years and older

Male

Average: 59%

Range: 52–66%

Average: 59%

Range: 43–73%

Average: 56%

Range: 47–67%

Female

Average: 56%

Range: 49–63%

Average: 50%

Range: 41–60%

Average: 47%

Range: 39–57%

How many liters is total body water?

Here are agewise total body water intake is given.

Age

Recommended total body water (milliliters per day)

0–6 months

700

6–12 months

800

1–2 years

1,300

4–8 years

1,700

9–13 years (males)

2,400

9–13 years (females)

2,100

14–18 years (males)

3,300

14–18 years (females)

2,300

Adult male

3,700

Adult female

2,700

During pregnancy

3,000

While breastfeeding

3,800

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