What vaccines are given at what age?

The recommended vaccination schedule varies depending on the country and the vaccine. In the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends a schedule of vaccinations for infants, children, teens, and adults.

For infants, the recommended vaccines include:

  • Hepatitis B (HepB) at birth
  • Rotavirus (RV) at 2 and 4 months
  • Diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (DTaP) at 2, 4, and 6 months
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) at 2, 4, and 6 months
  • Pneumococcal (PCV) at 2, 4, and 6 months
  • Inactivated poliovirus (IPV) at 2 and 4 months and a booster at 4-6 years
  • Measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) at 12-15 months
  • Varicella (chickenpox) at 12-15 months

For children, the recommended vaccines include:

  • Flu (annually) starting at 6 months
  • HPV at 11 or 12 years
  • Meningococcal at 11 or 12 years
  • Booster doses of DTaP, IPV, MMR, and chickenpox between ages 4 and 6

For teens and adults, the recommended vaccines include:

  • Flu (annually)
  • Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis) every 10 years
  • HPV for both males and females
  • Meningococcal for certain high-risk individuals
  • Shingles for adults 60 years and older

It's worth noting that these are general recommendations and the specific schedule for an individual may vary depending on their health status, medical history, and other factors. It's always best to consult with a healthcare professional for personalized recommendations.

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